Dec 15

Anticolonial Grammars of Relation in the Classroom

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Zoom
  • Add to Calendar 2022-12-15 13:30:00 2022-12-15 15:00:00 Anticolonial Grammars of Relation in the Classroom Image Anticolonial Grammars of Relation in the Classroom: This talk considers how discourses of institutional “inclusion” shape the kinds of relationships we cultivate in university classrooms in the name of equity and diversity. Through an analysis of the “prepositional politics” of how people relate to one another in academic spaces, I argue that the model of inclusivity reproduces the university as a colonial enclosure of power. By thinking through the terms of living treaties between First Nations and settlers in the place where I live and teach, I consider alternative grammars of relation toward anticolonial pedagogies.Eugenia Zuroski is Associate Professor of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University, which is located on the colonized territories of the Haudenosaunee and Mississauga peoples. Trained in British literature of the long eighteenth century, her research considers the colonial legacies of that period and ongoing movements against them. She is Editor of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction, Vice President of the Council of Editors of Learned Journals, and publishes poetry in addition to scholarly writing. Zoom Barnard College barnard-admin@digitalpulp.com America/New_York public
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promotional material for eugenia zuroski's beyond content lecture, 2022
Anticolonial Grammars of Relation in the Classroom: This talk considers how discourses of institutional “inclusion” shape the kinds of relationships we cultivate in university classrooms in the name of equity and diversity. Through an analysis of the “prepositional politics” of how people relate to one another in academic spaces, I argue that the model of inclusivity reproduces the university as a colonial enclosure of power. By thinking through the terms of living treaties between First Nations and settlers in the place where I live and teach, I consider alternative grammars of relation toward anticolonial pedagogies.

Eugenia Zuroski is Associate Professor of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University, which is located on the colonized territories of the Haudenosaunee and Mississauga peoples. Trained in British literature of the long eighteenth century, her research considers the colonial legacies of that period and ongoing movements against them. She is Editor of the journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction, Vice President of the Council of Editors of Learned Journals, and publishes poetry in addition to scholarly writing.